The Girls of Morningside

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Sinner or Opportunist?

Sinner or opportunist?

Only time will tell . . .

It’s really the weather’s fault.  Here in the Queen City, our winters are mild, but still cold.  In January, typical highs are around 50F, and lows are around 30F.  Not this year.  Yes, we DID have that cold snap the first weekend of the month that brought highs in the 30’s for three days, accompanied by a little sleet and snow.  But the rest of the month . . .

jan2017tempcalendar

Every week in January featured at least one day that felt like March or April.  (Calendar courtesy of Accuweather.)

For the month of January, there have been fourteen days with highs of 60F or higher, with five of those at least 70F, causing it to feel more like March or April much of the month. We’re not the only ones that have felt that way.  Both the plants and the bees have noticed, too, with early bloomers (such as red maples) blooming even earlier this year, and the bees availing themselves of the opportunity.  As we have stood at hive entrances on the warmer days, we’ve noticed the girls bringing in loads of yellow, orange and red pollen.  (The red pollen is almost assuredly from henbit.)

polleninjanuarycloseup

The girl in the middle of the picture lands near the entrance, her baskets loaded with bright yellow pollen.

And here is where I may have slipped into sin . . .  January is normally a pretty solidly cold month, and you have to get into February to get a few days around 60F or so to allow you to open up your hives for an inspection.  Well, this year, January afforded more options than February normally would.  What to do?!?  Crack the propolis seals between the boxes to get a glimpse of the inner activity, knowing that more cold weather is almost assuredly on its way?  Such a decision would surely be foolhardy and injurious to the bees.

But the decision was not that simple.  This fall was relatively warm, and now a March/April-like January . . . what if the bee populations are rebounding quickly?  Could we see early swarming?  Shouldn’t I get an idea of what the girls are doing, so I can take actions to encourage them to stay home?

As I said, the decision wasn’t an easy one, but I decided to take a chance, and opened up hives, not once, but twice!  The first time, during the second full week of January, my foray into the hives was more tenuous.  I only removed the top cover and a few frames in the top box in most of the hives.  But I had an opportunity to see something I’d never seen before.  Instead of being centered on the frame, the brood was centered on the bottom front corner of the one to three frames with brood in each hive.  It was amazing how consistent this was between the fourteen surviving hives.  (Two hives were dead, and a third was queenless.)   And hive configuration didn’t matter (we have double ten frame deep, single ten frame deep, and double nuc deep configurations in our beeyards).  The only variation was the location of the frames in the hive, with most on one side or the other, and a couple near the center of the hive.  Most were in the bottom, but a few hives had the brood in the top box.

splitburrcombcloseup

When one very active hive was opened, the burr comb split open, spilling honey that the girls quickly worked to salvage.

A second look the last week of January showed rapidly expanding brood populations.  (Perhaps too rapid.  I fear that the return of cold weather, predicted for much of early February, may find some hives with too few adult bees present to keep ALL of the brood warm.  We may see some chilled brood over the next few weeks.)  Any hive that had only one box, or where the brood was in the top box, was building burr comb between the top bars of the frames in the top box and the solid inner cover.  (They wouldn’t normally do that, but this year I experimented with putting shims under the inner covers to allow easy addition of pollen patties and other solid feeds for the girls, unintentionally providing enough space to encourage them to build comb when they were ready.)  One hive already had larva in the burr comb (how were they planning on keeping it warm?), while another had filled theirs with honey.

burrcomboninnercover

But most of the burr comb remained attached to the bottom of the solid inner cover. Like that left in the hive, this was filled with honey, which the bees quickly lapped up to return to its rightful home.

It was time to make adjustments.  Here are some of the things I did . . .

  • Combined the queenless (single deep) hive with a weaker, but still viable, single deep hive.
  • Any single deep ten frame hive that had built burr comb (come to think of it, that was all of them) had a second box added.  One was so strong, that I added its second box early.  Lo and behold, when I checked it again a week later, it has already added brood to two frames in the top box.

    superedhive

    One of the two hives that was given custody of a pair of supers. The other is at Nuthill Farms.

  • Two of the double deep ten frame hives had brood in both boxes and had built burr comb, one filling their burr comb with drone brood, and the other with honey.  A sign they were already looking for extra space.  I can’t believe I did this in January!  I put a queen excluder and a pair of empty supers on top of each.
  • I swapped boxes on hives that had brood only in the top box, providing them an opportunity to expand upward (which is the bees favorite winter movement).

So tell me . . . do you think I was a sinner or an opportunist?  The reality is, we can’t really know until another opportunity to look in those hives is available a few weeks from now.

So stay tuned to our little blog.  I will post a followup.

Ed

Spreading Some Sweetness

It was a beautiful cool morning, with an easy breeze moving through the pavilion.  We were booth #2 in the “Greenery Shed”, a location that contained a variety of vendors, although the focus was supposed to be on plants.  Our location made us one of the first booths people would see as they entered the Greenery Shed.  We were also right next to the concession area, so people seeking a snack as they spent their morning at the Charlotte Regional Farmers’ Market would often spot us, and come over to talk when they finished their snack.  Others were content to sit on the nearby benches and listen to us talking to our booth’s visitors.

Less than a couple of weeks earlier, our local bee association president called us and asked if we would be willing to coordinate a booth for National Honey Bee Day (August 15) at the Regional Farmers’ Market.  We discussed it briefly, consulted the Lord, and called Gerry back with a “yes.”  He sent us contact info for the Farmers’ Market and some club member phone numbers, and off we went.

Our most pressing priority was to recruit other beekeepers to work with us.  Some as expected, were busy.  But others were available, and were willing to graciously offer their Saturday morning to work with us.  We ended up with four really great folks who are all good beekeepers and enthusiastic about sharing their love for the girls:  Melinda and Todd, Karen, and David.

At the same time we were exchanging phone calls and e-mails with our fellow beekeepers, we got in touch with the lady who manages the farmers’ market, Amie Newsome.  Amie was very enthusiastic.  She wanted us to set up an educational booth in the same location used in the spring by the Master Gardener’s for their informational booth.  She was hoping to use a “scavenger hunt” to show how important bees are to the many different products sold by the vendors there at the Farmers’ Market.

This is what we saw the day we stopped into meet with Amie Newsome about setting up the beekeeping educational both at the Charlotte Regional Farmers' Market.

This is what we saw the day we stopped into meet with Amie Newsome about setting up the beekeeping educational both at the Charlotte Regional Farmers’ Market.

We visited the booth location with her, and realized that it was MUCH larger than what we were accustomed to.  To effectively use it, we would have to supply more than just a couple of tables with an observation hive and the club’s teaching hive.  In addition, Amie shared that, on a typical Saturday, approximately 2500 cars arrive at the market between 8 am and noon.  This meant we could potentially have a large crowd visiting us.  It would be better to have a larger variety of things for them to look at so we didn’t have people impatiently waiting to look at just a couple of things.

We, and a couple of others working the booth, produce small amounts of honey that we sell to the public, and were interested in selling honey as part of our informational activities.  This was a concern for Amie for two very good reasons:  She didn’t want the honey sales to detract from the informational nature of the booth, and she felt that our sale of honey would be unfair to the two beekeepers who were regular vendors at the the Farmers’ Market.  We understood her concerns.  First, we assured her that we would set up, and man, the booth so that it de-emphasized the honey sales.  Second, we agreed to pay the one day rental fee, and sign the paperwork, to allow us to sell honey as a vendor the one day we would be there.  In the end, I think that arrangement was a win-win for both us and Amie.

This was the booth on Saturday after we had set it up. We were flanked on the left with picnic tables folks could sit at while they ate food they'd purchased in the consignment area. On our right was a vendor who sold all sorts of beautiful plants and pots. The hive stand was set up closest to the aisle on the right hand side, with the table with the observation hive next to it. The card table with the teaching hive was on the left, and the honey sales table was furthest away from the aisle. Our van was parked behind the honey sales table. It's bumper became a convenient bench for the ladies to use when desired.

This was the booth on Saturday after we set it up. We were flanked on the left with picnic tables folks could sit at while they ate food they’d purchased in the consignment area. On our right was a vendor who sold all sorts of beautiful plants and pots. The hive stand was set up closest to the aisle on the right hand side, with  the observation hive table next to it. The card table with the teaching hive was on the left, and the honey sales table was furthest away from the aisle. Our van was parked behind the honey sales table. It’s bumper became a convenient bench for the ladies to use when desired.

We turned our attention next to how we would be setting up the booth.  First, there were the items the club would be providing:  A display table, observation hive (we had to supply the bees), teaching hive and club banner.  (But somehow, in the process of transferring the equipment to our van, Gerry and I forgot the banner . . .)  But what else would we put in this large 13′ x 24′ booth?

Fortunately, the timing of this display couldn’t have been better from an equipment availability standpoint.  We had a new hive that was freshly built and painted that was a week away from being put into service.  Along a similar vein we had freshly constructed frames and a new hive stand, all of which were slated for installation in another couple of weeks.  There were also a number of honey supers which had been extracted, and had just recently been put into storage, as well as an old hive that was in storage until we could get around to rehabilitating it.

It was 7:20 that morning when we arrived to unload the van and start setting up.  Over the next 30 minutes, our other beekeeping friends arrived to help us set up and prepare for the market opening at 8 am.

A couple who were very interested in becoming beekeepers listen to David as he explains the different hive components to them. The orange hive on the left was a new hive that contained newly made frames, while the hive on the right is an older hive with a super on top. The new hive was set up for winter conditions, while the old hive was set up for summer conditions with a strong nectar flow.

A couple who were very interested in becoming beekeepers listen to David as he explains the different hive components to them. The orange hive on the left was a new hive that contained newly made frames, while the hive on the right is an older hive with a super on top. The new hive was set up for winter conditions, while the old hive was set up for summer conditions with a strong nectar flow.

Things were a little slow, at first, but by 9 am, we had a strong crowd.  We had placed the hive stand, with a couple of hives, closest to the main aisle.  The placement worked well.  The equipment is relatively large, easy to see, and slowed folks down long enough for us to engage them.  Many adults, especially those who were thinking about becoming beekeepers, were intrigued by the hives.  We opened them up, explained the different types of equipment and how they were utilized.

One really good feature was having a new, never used hive next to an older one.  We were able to show the “pristine” appearance of the internals of the new hive and contrast that with what the bees had done to the internals of the older hive.  Folks were especially fascinated by the girls’ use of propolis in the hive to seal cracks, trap vermin (e.g., hive beetles), and coat the interior with an anti-bacterial layer.  We explained that they did this, whether using natural or manmade hives.

Another popular feature of the hive exhibit was the honey super.  We would remove a frame, sniff the pleasing aroma of honey with a smile and a sigh of contentment, and then hold it out for the visitors to smell.  They were surprised, and delighted, to find that even after extraction and cleaning by the bees, the wax retained the sweet smell of fresh honey.

The kids loved watching the bees. This little fella was delighted!

The kids loved watching the bees. This little fella was delighted!

Next to the hive stand, away from the “madding crowd”, was a table with the observation hive.  As might be expected, it was a big hit with all of the kids, and was their favorite part of the exhibit.  It featured a frame filled with capped brood and a little nectar.  For some reason, the girls had uncapped a few of the cells, and removed the brood for disposal.  Unfortunately, there was nowhere for them to put the dead brood, so they ran around the hive, desperately seeking a hive entrance so they could dispose of the dead bodies.

Todd and Melinda answer questions about the girls and their lifecycle.

Todd and Melinda answer questions about the bees and their lifecycle while a mother and child watch the girls in action.

This provided quite a show for those watching, and many asked questions about what the bees were doing.  We theorized (probably incorrectly) that some of the brood may have been chilled while the frame sat in our home overnight in the observation hive.  Using this premise, we would tell our visitors the sad story of the chilled brood, which would give us an opportunity to tell them about how the girls maintain a hive temperature of 93F throughout the year, and how critical it is for the brood.  We explained how they maintain that temperature, by clustering and vibrating their wing muscles in cooler weather, or gathering water and using it to air condition the hive.  (“Yes, that’s right.  The bees knew about air conditioning long before we discovered it.”)

Karen attracts a crowd as she shares her experiences with the girls.

Karen attracts a crowd as she shares her experiences with the girls.

On the same table, we had a typical ventilated bee jacket (which didn’t seem to interest most folks), and a poster that shows the life cycle of the bees in their larval and pupal stages.  The chart was a great tool for showing the physical differences between the various types of bees (workers vs. queens vs. drones), and illustrating their progress from egg to bee.

While only a few folks perused the frames in the teaching hive, many took time to partake of the wisdom painted on its side.

While only a few folks perused the frames in the teaching hive, many took time to partake of the wisdom painted on its side.

On the other side of the booth was a small card table with the teaching hive and a laminated information sheet about the bee association’s annual bee school.  A number of folks who are interested in beekeeping took picture of the info sheet with their phones for future reference.

The teaching hive–which utilizes frames with pictures of different activities and problems in the hive–was not used as much as we had envisioned. It was still quite useful, though, especially when explaining some of the problems bees encounter, such as hive beetles and varroa mites.

Everyone wanted to taste the honeys! Karen (in the red), Marianne (yellow) and Melinda (white) offer free honey tastes to our visitor, and answer their question about the differences between the honeys.

Everyone wanted to taste the honeys! Karen (in the red), Marianne (yellow) and Melinda (grey) offer free honey tastes to our visitors, and answer their questions about the differences between the honeys.

As promised to Amie, we set the honey sales table up at the back of the booth.  While we were selling honey there, it was also a critical part of the teaching experience, We provided free tastings of the different types of honey we were selling.  Karen had honey produced in the Ballantyne area, Todd and Melinda had honey from Providence Plantation, and we brought honey from both of our beeyards, one near Plaza-Midwood, and the other from the Weddington area.  All had different flavors and colors, which intrigued folks.  This provided for a discussion about differences in nectar sources, and how that could vary depending on location and time of year.  A lot of folks didn’t buy our honey, but all left with a better knowledge of the factors that influence honey appearance and flavor.

For Todd and Melinda, this was the first year they produced enough honey to have sales, and sold their first jar that morning.  Marianne made sure Melinda got the bill for that first jar, and Melinda claims she’s going to frame it.  🙂

There was never a dull moment that morning. Many folks wandered in to learn about the bees.

There was never a dull moment that morning. Many folks wandered in to learn about the bees.

All in all, it was a delightful morning.  The weather was sunny, but surprisingly comfortable.  Thanks to the hard work and enthusiasm of our friends, David, Karen, Todd and Melinda, we were able to bless the hundreds of folks who came by and wanted to know more about honey bees and those strange folk called beekeepers who are devoted to them.

We’re looking forward to more opportunities to reach out to the public in the future.

Ed

Bottling by Coleman Lantern

Now that we’ve had several opportunities to bottle our honey, and have gotten proficient at it, we saw our honey bottling operation a week and a half ago as a non-event.  Well, even the best laid plans of mice and men . . .

We had just completed bottling honey from Nuthill Farms, and were starting to set up to bottle honey from our Morningside apiary when it happened . . . The lights flickered off, the refrigerator compressor went silent, and a couple of devices with battery back up beeped loudly to inform us of their dire straits.

I walked out to see if something had happened to our line when our next door neighbor drove up, clearly shaken.  She said that her car (which had the top down, and was carrying two or three children) was barely missed by a power pole struck by a police car that lost control as it conducted a high speed chase down Central Ave.  The whole street (and probably many others) was without power.

This picture, which was taken without flash, shows the lighting condition we had with the Coleman lantern.  But this was before we peeled off a couple of sections to locate in other sections of the kitchen.

This picture, which was taken without flash, shows the lighting condition we had with the Coleman lantern. But this was before we peeled off a couple of sections to locate in other parts of the kitchen.

After making sure she was OK, I went back in and called Duke Energy’s power outage number, and was informed they were already aware of the problem, and estimated the time for power to be restored at 7:30 pm.  I was impressed, given that it had only been 10 minutes since we lost power.  I thought, “We’ll see . . .”  (But I also know that Duke tends to be conservative in their power restoration estimates.)

On of the first things we did when we got started was to pour the honey into a filter inserted into the top of the bottling bucket to provide one more chance to remove any undesirable solids, such as wax.

One of the first things we did when we got started was to pour the honey into a filter inserted into the top of the bottling bucket to provide one more chance to remove any undesirable solids, such as wax.

It was hot outside, so even with the AC off, it was cooler to stay in the house.  We read for a while.  But then the ants got to me.  You know, the ones in my pants.  I found our Coleman lantern, turned it on, and placed it in the kitchen so I could begin setting up for our final run with the Morningside honey when the power was restored.

Well, it was good and bad that I did that.  It was good to be prepared for when power was restored.  But it was bad for those ants in my pants.  They just kept stinging me, making it impossible for me to sit back down.

This picture, also taken without a flash, shows how the lighting improved  when one of the sections of the lantern was moved to a different part of the kitchen.  Clearly enough light to work by.  The scale is battery powered, so it was not impacted by the outage.

This picture, also taken without a flash, shows how the lighting improved when one of the sections of the lantern was moved to a different part of the kitchen. Clearly enough light to work by. The scale is battery powered, so it was not impacted by the outage.

And so, with Marianne’s reluctant agreement, we resumed bottling, with our only light coming from the Coleman lantern and some outside light that filtered through the rooms surrounding the kitchen.  (Our kitchen, which earlier in the life of the house looked directly onto the backyard, is now in the center of the downstairs, completely surrounded by other rooms.  It does, however, include three doors–how insane is that for a kitchen?  We have also left the window–sans glass–over the sink.  So while it’s not brightly lit by outside light, it does get some.)

Got our power back!  Now nearing the end of the bottling, we had to completely open the honey gat to get flow into the bottle.  You can actual see the surface of the honey in the bottling bucket.

Got our power back! Now nearing the end of the bottling, we had to completely open the honey gate to get flow into the bottle. You can actually see the surface of the honey in the bottling bucket.

I should probably explain here that our Coleman lantern is not the traditional propane-fueled model.  Rather, it is a true 21st century LED model that was gifted to us a few years back by a good friend.  This means it’s battery powered, and has a unique feature where four smaller lights can be peeled from the base unit–which stores the eight D-cell batteries that provide the main power.  The four smaller pieces each have a rechargeable lithium ion battery, that is charged from the main batteries in the base unit.  So I removed a couple of the smaller units, and located them strategically around the kitchen, leaving the main unit to sit on the range.

While this wasn’t as ideal as our normal lighting condition, it was sufficient.  So, resume bottling we did!

Well, I have to give Duke credit, they outperformed their time estimate.  It was around 6:30 pm when the lights flickered back on.  We had completed bottling the quart jars, and were just about to start on the 1 lb. squeeze bottles.  So we completed our bottling in “normal” light.

Fortunately, we were able to label our bottles in full light the next day.  Gracious, I have enough trouble in good light getting the labels on straight!  I can’t imagine what it would be like in dim light  . . .

Here's our final product.  We're blessed to be able to partner with the Morningside girls to produce this honey for the benefit of our friends and neighbors.

Here’s our final product. We’re blessed to be able to partner with the Morningside girls to produce this honey for the benefit of our friends, neighbors and customers.

You know, it makes me appreciate my ancestors more, having experienced this.  There were so many activities they had to do in their homes, which were rarely well lit.  And they did them well . . .

Even beekeepers, who are not considered to be particularly high tech, benefit greatly from modern technology.

Ed

Taking Our Frames Out for a Quick Spin

It was mid-July, again, time for our annual honey harvest.  We had already extracted 90 lbs in May from the girls at Nuthill Farms.  But early July marks the normal end of the nectar flow here in the Piedmont Carolinas, so we dutifully went through the frames at both beeyards, resulting in a total of seven supers of honey.

Our bee mentors, who have a nice honey house and extraction set up, were kind enough to invite us over to use their equipment on the day after they completed their honey extraction.  While the manually-driven rental extractor we can rent through the Mecklenburg County Beekeeper’s Association is very nice, you’re in a whole different league when you are able to use a motor driven extractor, and don’t have to move stuff around in your kitchen to use the extractor.

In my humble opinion, an electric extractor is always preferred over a manual extractor.  There are several reasons for this.  First, it’s a lot easier work.  (OK, I guess the downside is we don’t get as much exercise.)  Secondly, it’s a lot faster, because the electric extractor can sling honey from the frames a lot faster than a manual one can.  (This has to do with the fact that, as the frames empty out, the electric extractor can get to much higher speeds than a manual one can.)  Third, it allows the use of a punch roller uncapper, which does less damage to the comb than other uncapping processes (such as a hot uncapping knife), and produces less uncapping wax than other processes.  (Of course, if you’re making a lot of income from selling wax products, this would not be a plus . . .)  And finally, it allows a higher recovery rate of honey.  (Testing done by a local Charlotte area beekeeper last year showed about 10% more honey extracted when using an electric extractor compared to a manual extractor.  Of course, this isn’t all bad, since the honey left in the frames is fed back to the bees.  But if you’re running out of honey before the next year’s harvest, it’s nice to have that extra 10%.)

Using this equipment, we were able to extract seven supers of honey in a little less than three hours.  It would take us approximately twice that long using the club’s manual extractor.  What a blessing to have access to such great equipment!

The following pictures and video clip give you a flavor for the setup, and how it worked.

Ed

Extraction is always more fun when it's a team effort.  Our team consisted of Marianne, myself, and two folks from Wing Haven who were there to observe (our bee mentor put them to work . . .)  Marianne is in the middle of flipping frames to be uncapped, while it appears that, as usual, I'm standing around trying to figure what to do.  :-)  The full super with frames waiting to be uncapped was staged on the far right.  Frames are taken from there, and put on a uncapping jig over an uncapping tank.  Once the frames have been uncapped, they are place in an empty super box located over a large baking pan (directly in front of me) that captures honey drips.  When the extractor is fiinished, extracted frames are moved into the waiting box on the front, and frames are loaded into the extractor from the box over the pan.  Before extraction begins, the floor and table are covered with old, clean newspapers.  If honey drips on floor, we simply lay another newspaper over the drip to prevent honey being from being tracked all over the room.

Extraction is always more fun when it’s a team effort. Our team consisted of Marianne, myself, and two folks from Wing Haven who were there to observe (our bee mentor put them to work . . .) Marianne is in the middle of flipping frames to be uncapped, while it appears that, as usual, I’m standing around trying to figure what to do. 🙂 The full super with frames waiting to be uncapped was staged on the far right. Frames are taken from there, and put on a jig over an uncapping tank. Once the frames have been uncapped, they are placed in an empty super box located over a large baking pan (directly in front of me) that captures honey drips. When the extractor is finished, extracted frames are moved into the waiting box on the front, and frames are loaded into the extractor from the box over the pan. Before extraction begins, the floor and table are covered with old, clean newspapers. If honey drips on the floor, we simply lay another newspaper over the drip to prevent honey being from being tracked all over the room.

This close up shows the jig over the honey tank that holds two frames at a time.  As the roller runs over the cells, it punches holes into the cappings.  Usually, to effectively open all of the holes, the roller will have to be rolled several times over a frame, and may require perpendicular movements, as well, particularly in corners and other difficult to reach spots.  If you can't reach all of the cells with the punch roller uncapper, you can use a cappings scratcher to open the few that remain.  After one side has been rolled, the frames are flipped over for the other side.

This close up shows the jig over the honey tank that holds two frames at a time. As the roller runs over the cells, it punches holes into the cappings. Usually, to effectively open all of the holes, the roller will have to be rolled several times over a frame, and may require perpendicular movements, as well, particularly in corners and other difficult to reach spots. If you can’t reach all of the cells with the punch roller uncapper, you can use a cappings scratcher to open the few that remain. After one side has been rolled, the frames are flipped over to do the other side.

This very short clip gives you an idea of how fast the electric motor radial extractor spins.  This is a nine frame model, and includes variable speed and bi-directional controls.  If you watch the top of the picture, you’ll see our bee mentor (who was getting bored at this point) uncapping a frame.

An Early Nectar Dearth

Although it started off with some up and down temperatures, spring was moving along very nicely, with local plants blooming profusely, and the girls bringing in lots of nectar and pollen.  Then May hit.  From a temperature standpoint, May wasn’t a bad month.  But we only got 0.2 inches of rain (the average for May is 3.66 inches).  The impact wasn’t immediate, but by the end of the month, fewer plants were blooming, and the blooms weren’t as rich in nectar as they had been.  Beekeepers refer to it as a nectar dearth.

As the lack of rain of continued into June and July, we saw the girls adjust to the drought (Mecklenburg County, where we have our home apiary, and neighboring Union County, where the Nuthill Farms girls are located, are both currently classified as being in moderate drought).  On the hives with honey supers, where there were frames that needed comb to be built, comb-building activities ceased.  Some cells in the supers that were partially filled with nectar were cleaned out.  (We’re not sure whether the nectar was consumed, or added to other cells to fill them.)

This table shows the monthly average rainfall in Charlotte for each month through July, and shows the actual rainfall at our Morningside beeyard for the same months.  While the rainfall through April was lower than normal, it took a nosedive starting in May.

This table shows the monthly average rainfall in Charlotte for each month through July, and shows the actual rainfall at our Morningside beeyard for the same months. While the rainfall through April was lower than normal, it took a nosedive starting in May.

It was interesting to note the difference between the two beeyards.  The Nuthill Farms hives, where we harvested about 90 lbs of honey in late May, we replaced the harvested supers with new ones that had foundation only frames.  This was early in the drought, and we were optimistic that the rain would return, and the Nuthill girls would resume aggressive comb-building activites.  That didn’t happen.  As a result, those hives were left with a lot of frames with partially built out comb.  One of the interesting dynamics we ran into when we did our main harvest on July 18, was a number of frames from those hives had 100% capped cells, but those cells only covered a portion of the frame.  The rest of the frame would have a combination of bare foundation, partially built comb, or fully built comb that was completely empty.  So a number of the frames we harvested from those hives were only partially filled with honey.

These are a couple of partially capped frames from the Nuthill Farms hives.  The top frame is mostly capped, with only a small amount of empty cells.  The bottom frame has only a little capped honey, and consists mostly of empty cells.

These are a couple of partially capped frames from the Nuthill Farms hives. The top frame is mostly capped, with only a small amount of empty cells. The bottom frame has only a little capped honey, and consists mostly of empty cells.

The girls of Morningside were a different story.  Of course, they got an unfair advantage . . .  Of the six supers we placed on them, half of them were empty supers from the May honey harvest at Nuthill Farms.  As a result, the vast majority of frames in their supers had completely built out comb.  So all of the frames we harvested from the Morningside apiary were slap full of honey.

As a result, even though we harvested one whole super more of honey from Nuthill Farms, because so many of the frames were “partials”, we only got about ten more pounds of honey from the Nuthill Farms bees than we did from the girls of Morningside.

Whether this drought will continue, and if so, how it will impact the girls going into the winter will be something we will be monitoring closely over the next few months.

Ed

Celebrating Independence Day in an Apian Way

How do you celebrate the nation’s independence?  Do you march in a parade, watch fireworks, or join friends or family for grilled hamburgers and hot dogs?

Well, in recognition of Independence Day, we spent our morning establishing two new sovereign queendoms–Cashew and Chestnut–in the faraway land of Nuthill Farms.  Long live the queens!!

This is what our approach to the Nuthill Farms hives looked like the past couple of months.

This is what our approach to the Nuthill Farms hives looked like the past couple of months.

Solid honey production by the two hives at Nuthill Farms–Acorn and Buckeye–this year, in spite of late spring/early summer drought, confirmed the wisdom of our plan to increase the number of hives at that location this year.  This was done by making splits off of Buckeye and hives here at our Morningside apiary.  (I will share more about the honey production and splits in future posts.)

Didn't Marianne do a great job??  Do you think this rendering of a Cashew is good enough that the girls will know we named their hive Cashew?

Didn’t Marianne do a great job?? Do you think this rendering of a cashew is good enough that the girls will know we named their hive “Cashew”?

By mid-June, we had five viable splits in various phases of development, including an early split from the Buckeye hive that is currently producing some honey.  Two of these–in double nuc hives–were deemed to be ready for transfer to Nuthill Farms in preparation for next year.

The bees were ready . . . but we weren’t.  We still needed to build new frames, hive boxes and the hive stand, paint some of the equipment, and set it all up at Nuthill Farms before moving the girls there.

Marianne did a great job with this hive box, too?  Do you think this rendering of a Chestnut is good enough that the girls will know we named their hive Chestnut?

Marianne did a great job with this hive box, too! From the painting on the front of their hive, do you think the girls will know it’s named “Chestnut”?

The preparations took the better part of a week, with the decorative painting of the hive stand and the hive boxes being the climactic event.  Since my artistic capabilities are limited to stick figures, this was a job for Marianne.  And what a fabulous job she did!

The move involved a lot of time and equipment, so we decided it would be prudent to do it over a two day period, installing the hive stand and the new hive boxes on the first day, then moving the girls to their new home on the second day.

But the real work of art was this hive stand, which includes a wonderful quote from Ezekial 20:6.  Marianne says the four bees are distinctly different, with a queen bee, worker bee, drone bee and baby bee.  Can you tell which is which?

But the real work of art was this hive stand, which includes a wonderful quote from Ezekial 20:6. Marianne says the four bees are distinctly different, with a queen bee, worker bee, drone bee and baby bee. Can you tell which is which?

No matter how hard I try to make all of the components square, it seems that things will still wobble, so I always keep a supply of shims I can use to eliminate the wobble.  They're cheap and easy to use.

No matter how hard I try to make all of the components square, it seems that things will still wobble, so I always keep a supply of shims I can use to eliminate the wobble. They’re cheap and easy to use.

So on July 3, we packed up the van, and I headed over to Nuthill Farms to install the hive stand, along with the new hive boxes.  I won’t go into all of the details of the hive stand set up, since an earlier post, A Retiring Beeyard, discusses in detail the set up of the same type of hive stand in our home apiary.  The main difference between the two installations was the greater slope at Nuthill Farms.  If I were to do this over again, I would have bought a third 16×16 paver, and used it to double stack pavers on the lower end of the hive stand.  This would have eliminated a lot of digging, and would have kept the upper paver from essentially being underground.

This picture shows what one of our double decker nucs looks like.  The propolis does the real work of keeping the boxes together, but the straps provide an extra measure to keep the hive together in the even of a spill.  Notice how the entrance is taped shut.  And isn't that a great little cart?  I purchased it to help with this move, but see that it will also be VERY helpful moving larger hives AND heavy honey supers for harvesting.  It's rated weighted capacity is 800 lbs, which is way more than I will ever be able to load on it.

This picture shows what one of our double decker nucs looks like. The propolis does the real work of keeping the boxes together, but the straps provide an extra measure to keep the hive together in the event of a spill. Notice how the entrance is taped shut. And isn’t that a great little cart? I purchased it to help with this move, but see that it will also be VERY helpful moving larger hives AND heavy honey supers for harvesting. It’s rated weight capacity is 800 lbs, which is way more than I will ever be able to load on it.

The next day–July 4, Independence Day–was the big day:  Moving the girls from their small nuc homes to their new independent queendoms in the fair land of Nuthill Farms.  The evening before, I removed the top feeders from the double nucs, and put the moving straps around them.

Early that morning, I sealed the entrances with Frog tape, and loaded the girls into the van for transport to their new home.  Then began the slow process of converting two small 10-frame hives into two full-size 18-frame double deep hives (we use 10-frame deep boxes with nine frames per box).  Rather than stick all of the frames from the double nucs into a single 10-frame deep box, we concentrated them in the bottom box, and put a few in the top box, filling in with new foundation-only frames.  Because of information we’ve gleaned from the bee journals, we placed foundation-only frames above frames with brood, because this supposedly encourages the bees to build out the comb on those new frames as quickly as possible.

We installed beetle traps in both boxes of each hive, and then topped them off with top feeders, which we filled with sugar water.  (With the continuing drought here in the Charlotte area, the nectar flow remains low.  The sugar water will provide the necessary nutrients to allow the girls to produce wax for comb-building, and continue to expand their brood area.)

The girls also went from being mere numbers (we number our nuc boxes) to mature hives with their own special names.

The girls were generally calm through all of this, but became a bit cranky towards the end.  This is understandable.  After all, not only were we uprooting them from the familiar surroundings around our home, but they were getting new homes with their furniture (frames) totally rearranged.

You can see the results in the following pictures.

I wonder if the girls will be shooting off fireworks on Independence Day, next year, to celebrate the anniversary of the founding of their new queendoms?

Long live the queens!

Ed

P.S.   For those of you who follow this blog, I owe all of you a big apology. I have not posted anything about our girls or the garden since February.  I plan to write a number of posts in the coming weeks to fill in the gap.  So you will likely see a mix of posts about current activities and events from earlier this year.  Hope they won’t be too confusing . . .

This is the front of Cashew and Chestnut hives.  While the little stylized paintings are cute, they also serve a very practical purpose of helping the bees differentiate between hives.

This is the front of Cashew and Chestnut hives. While the little stylized paintings are cute, they also serve the very practical purpose of helping the bees differentiate between hives.

This is the final view of Cashew & Chestnut hives from the rear.  This is what we see every time we come out to work with the bees, since we always work from the back of the hives.

This is the final view of Cashew & Chestnut hives from the rear. This is what we see every time we come out to work with the bees, since we always work from the back of the hives.

This is what our approach to the Nuthill Farms hives looks like, now.

This is what our approach to the Nuthill Farms hives looks like, now.

Silent Sunday

What a wonderful way to spend a hot summer day: Watching the bees as they flit from one bloom to another, busily acquiring nectar and pollen for their nestmates . . .

Forest Garden

Allium with beesAllium with bees

~

“Handle a book as a bee does a flower,

extract its sweetness but do not damage it.”
.

John Muir

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June 7, 2015  Yorktown 099~

“One can no more approach people without love

than one can approach bees without care.

Such is the quality of bees…”
.

Leo Tolstoy

~

June 7, 2015  Yorktown 094

~

Woodland Gnome 2015

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A Retiring Beeyard

Insanity is doing the same thing over and over while expecting different results.

–  Attributed to a variety of folks, including Franklin, Voltaire, Boswell and Einstein

When we started beekeeping three years ago, everything we did, from clearing the beeyard, to painting our hives, was a work of love (see A Little About Our Journey – Getting Started).  The location of the beeyard seemed perfect for our less than perfect (for beekeeping) yard, which is a corner lot that does not offer good privacy in the backyard.  Our first beeyard was on the side of the yard furthest from the side street.  It was behind the garage, on the east side, providing a good break from Charlotte’s predominantly northwest to southwest winds.  Existing plants blocked much of the view from the side street.  And the location and orientation of the hives was such that we weren’t concerned about crossing the girls’ primary route to and from their homes when working the backyard.

However, there were a couple of problems.  First, the hives were relatively close to the compost pile, which we have learned can be a significant breeding ground for small hive beetles.  Also, since we did these preparations in the middle of the winter, we did not fully understand how little sun the hives would get from late spring through early fall.  (Less than an hour or two per day.)  This can also cause problems with hive beetles, and is thought to worsen varroa mite infestations.

When we established our second apiary in the backyard a year later, we moved it closer to the side street, allowing it to get about six hours of sun per day, which is the most any area of the yard, including our vegetable garden, gets.  Frankly, we’re not sure we’ve really seen any fewer hive beetles in the new location, but we realized the lack of sunlight when inspecting the hives made it more difficult to examine the frames, so we decided it made sense to close down the original beeyard, and consolidate the location of all of the hives in our yard in one area.  This was also possible because we had sized the second apiary to be able to accommodate up to nine hives, whereas the original apiary was limited to three hives.

Given the apparent issues with the original apiary, and the space available in the new one, we felt that we were beginning the fit the above definition for insanity.  With the death of Georgia Tech, the hives remaining in the original beeyard–a single deep hive and a double-decker nuc–made this an ideal time from the standpoint of easy movement of hives.  So early one morning, I closed up those hives, and moved them close to the new apiary.  I then moved the pieces of the hive stand to the new apiary.  I’ll let the following pictures tell the story (and save thousands of words in the process . . .)

Enjoy,

Ed

We are fortunate to have a fairly level area for this beeyard, so setting up the hivestand so that it would be level along it's length, and have a slight tilt down towards the front of the hives was fairly easy.  I would simply dig up a little sod, level the top of the soil by eyeballing it, then lay the paver in place, and check it with a level.  Of course, I never it got it right the first time, so would have to remove the level, add or remove soil where the paver set, then put it back down and check with level again.  It took me several tries to get the paver just right.

We are fortunate to have a fairly level area for this beeyard, so setting up the hivestand to be level along its length, and have a slight tilt down towards the front of the hives was fairly easy. I simply dug up a little sod, levelled the top of the soil by eyeballing it, then layed the paver in place, and checked it with a level. Of course, I never it got it right the first time, so had to remove the paver, added or removed soil where it sat, then put it back down and checked it with the level again. It took me several tries to get the paver just right.

 

This picture shows both pavers in place.  What it doesn't show is that in order to make sure they were at the same height, ensure the hivestand itself would be level, I would take a straight board, lay it across the two pavers, and make adjustments to the soil under the second paver (in this case, the one on the left) to make it level across both pavers.

This picture shows both pavers in place. What it doesn’t show is that in order to make sure they were at the same height, ensuring the hivestand itself would be level, I took a straight board, lay it across the two pavers, and made adjustments to the soil under the second paver (in this case, the one on the left) to make the board level across both pavers.

The next step, which might well be the easiest, was to put the blocks on top of the pavers.  It's VERY important to use pavers that are as long, or longer, in both dimensions as the concrete blocks to ensure that the concrete blocks, and ultimately the hivestand, remain stable.  Again, I checked the level/tilt of the blocks before moving to the next step.

The next step was to put the blocks on top of the pavers. It’s VERY important to use pavers that are as long, or longer, in both dimensions as the concrete blocks to ensure that the concrete blocks, and ultimately the hivestand, remain stable. Again, I checked the level/tilt of the blocks before moving to the next step.

The hive stand's in place!  Again, I checked with the level before placing the hives on top.  This particular hivestand is made with 2x6 untreated lumber and painted.  (There's debate among beekeepers about whether using treated wood to support hives is a problem, but I prefer to stay away from it.)  The stand is six feet long, and the pieces in the middle are a foot long.  When putting it together, I make sure the middle pieces are 1/4" - 1/2" lower than the main pieces to prevent interference with the hives.  Also, note how far apart the blocks are under the hivestand.  This prevents tilting problems similar to that experienced by our beekeeping friend (see Planning for Gravity in the Beeyard).

The hive stand’s in place! Again, I checked with the level before placing the hives on top. This particular hivestand is made with 2×6 untreated lumber and painted. (There’s debate among beekeepers about whether using treated wood to support hives is a problem, but I prefer to stay away from it.) The stand is six feet long, and the pieces in the middle are a foot long. When putting it together, I make sure the middle pieces are 1/4″ – 1/2″ lower than the main pieces to prevent interference with the hives. Also, note how far apart the blocks are under the hivestand. This prevents tilting problems similar to that experienced by our beekeeping friend (see Planning for Gravity in the Beeyard).

Finally, the girls arrive at their new home.  Technically, we exceeded the "less than  30 feet" guideline that is recommended for moving hives, but since we didn't let the girls out of their hives before completing the move, they didn't seem to have problems adjusting to their new location.

Finally, the girls arrive at their new home. Technically, we exceeded the “less than 30 feet” guideline that is recommended for moving hives, but since we didn’t let the girls out of their hives before completing the move, they didn’t seem to have problems adjusting to their new location.

Our First Fair

Marianne gets all of the credit for this.  After all, it was her idea.  Our church was hosting an arts and crafts fair similar to the one from last year.  We weren’t able to go to that one, so we didn’t know much about it, although a lot of folks said it was fun and there was a lot of great stuff there.

Marianne thought it would be fun to sell some of our honey at the craft fair.  I was much less enthusiastic.  After all, the amount we harvested this year (2014) was within a pound or two of what we harvested the year before, and we easily sold all of that before we harvested the next year’s batch.  So why did we need to go to the trouble and expense of setting up for a craft fair (or farmer’s market, or similar forum)?  Besides, how did honey products fit into an art and crafts fair???  That of course, was the engineer in me talking . . .

Marianne had other ideas.  She wanted to make a bunch of little honey bears for Christmas stocking stuffers.  Engineer Ed couldn’t conceive why anyone would buy a little dinky honey bear over a much more practical–and cost effective–quart jar (almost three pounds of honey!).

In the end, the artistic half of our beekeeping operation won out.  Marianne called up the lady coordinating the fair and pitched the idea to her.  The lady was extremely enthusiastic about having a honey booth at the fair.  So we paid our booth rental fee and began the process of preparing for the fair.

One of the things I really appreciate about our marriage, and working together as beekeepers, is how our talents and ways of doing things compliment one another.  Marianne took care of all of the artistic type things, like how to decorate the 2 1/2 ounce honey bear bottles to make them appealing as Christmas gifts for family, friends and co-workers and decorating the booth to make the product displays eye-catching.  As the more practical-minded half of our little partnership, I took care of logistical details, like figuring out the most efficient method of filling the little bears, developing a system for effectively recording honey sales, and laying out a plan for our booth.

These little gift bears, which we used as part of a Christmas display at home, are ready for the cold, dressed in their colorful Christmas scarves.

These little gift bears, which we used as part of a Christmas display at home, are ready for the cold, dressed in their colorful Christmas scarves.

We talked about the products we wanted to sell at the fair.  Since we had a limited number of quart jars, we decided not to sell those at the fair.  We decided we would focus on honey bears and 1-lb. squeeze bottles.  We invited a beekeeper friend to provide us with her own home-made lip balm.  Just for fun–especially since this was a craft fair–I decided to try to sell some note cards that I have made for years for my own personal use.  Finally, our friend Jim, who owns Nut Hill Farm, agreed to provide some floral decorations from his farm.  So, we became a honey-plus operation.

One of the challenges for us was putting together a booth, since we had never done this before, and didn’t have a table, etc., to use.  So I reached out to our bee mentor, who is also currently the local Bee Association’s president, and asked if we could borrow a few things for the fair.  Gerry was all too gracious, and loaned us a nice, lightweight folding table, the Bee Club’s observation hive (which accommodated a single frame from one of our very own hives), a demonstration hive box (see description in following picture’s caption) and a beautiful hand-crafted display shelf that Gerry himself had made.

We supplemented these things with some table cloths, lights, and a special Christmas display that a dear friend had made and given to us a dozen years earlier.  All that remained was to fill the bears with honey, label them, and tie little ribbons about their necks to look like Christmas scarves.  I have to give Marianne credit–the end result was really cute and appealing.

The Sunday before the fair, a young friend, Zeke, a first-grader, asked us after church if we would like to buy one of his hand-loomed bracelets.  We bought one and then I approached his mother, whom we are good friends with, and told her that we probably had enough extra space at our booth for Zeke to sell his bracelets there, if he wanted.  I asked that she let us know a couple of days before the fair so we could be prepared for him.  The final answer:  an enthusiastic “YES”!

The fair was held in late October and the weather was starting to get cool.  So, the afternoon prior to the fair, while it was still warm, I went into one of our hives, found a frame with brood, food and the queen on it, and carefully placed it into the Observation Hive.  I brought it in for the night (which was going to bee chilly), so the girls could stay warm.

That evening we went over to the church to set up the booth.  The following morning, we completed our set-up prior to the fair’s opening, and met some of the other vendors.  Zeke and his family came in, and we helped him hang his bracelets on the display board we provided.  We helped him by encouraging him to mark each bracelet with the appropriate price, and coached him on how to talk to folks about his bracelets.  He was very grateful for the help, and did indeed sell several bracelets during the course of the day.

Our "booth" at the church crafts fair included honey, note cards, beeswax-based lip balm, and decorative fall floral arrangements.  Our friend, Zeke, was located on the end on the right side, sitting in front of a little display board we provided for his to hang his bracelets on for display.

Our “booth” at the church crafts fair included honey, note cards, beeswax-based lip balm, and decorative fall floral arrangements. Our friend, Zeke, was located on the end on the right side, sitting in front of a little display board we provided for him to hang his bracelets on. Closest to the edge on the left hand side, where potential buyers could see them, were the honey bears, the 1 lb squeeze bottles, note cards, and beeswax-based lip balm. The observation hive is almost hidden in this picture. It is behind the little display rack, and is yellow. You can easily see how adults would have walked by without seeing it. Another neat thing borrowed from the Bee Association that was very useful in talking to people was the demonstration hive, which is the white box all the way in the back on the left side. It is an actual hive box with “frames” that have pictures showing different things and conditions in the hive.

I wish I could say it was a huge crowd that showed up, but it wasn’t.  At times, it was very light.  At other times, it was comfortably attended.  But it was never heavy.  Nonetheless, I was surprised at how well we did.  People were very interested in the little Christmas stocking stuffer honey bears (we sold approximately fifty over the course of that day).  We also sold about a dozen of the 1-lb. squeeze bottles.  The beeswax and coconut oil lip balm didn’t move as effectively as we had hoped, even though packaged and labelled very attractively; but we still sold a few.  We sold only two of my note cards (no real loss there; the left-overs were either given out as Christmas gifts to family or added to my personal stash).  I think the big disappointment was our failure to sell even a single floral arrangement from Jim’s farm.  (However, Jim was able to sell a number of them after the fair.)

I must say, though, the best part of the fair was the interaction with the other people there, both customers and vendors.  One of the interesting dynamics was the Observation Hive.  I deliberately did NOT place it close to the main traffic in order to prevent it from accidentally being knocked to the floor and possibly filling the church with bees.  That placement, combined with the fact that it was sitting on a table approximately 3-feet off of the floor, meant most adults didn’t even notice it.

But not the young kids . . . The Observation Hive was just about eye-level for them!  They would spot it, and eagerly drag  their parents into the booth.  I then engaged both parent and child in a dialogue about the bees, peppering them with questions and filling their heads with all sorts of bee facts and trivia.  My favorite question to ask them was “How many bees do you think it would take to make a pound of honey?”.  (Answer:  750 – 800)

While all of the kids were engaging and fun, my two favorite were a couple of homeschoolers from different families.  In both cases, I wasn’t sure who was dragging whom:  Mom with her child, or the child pulling on her mom.  But in both cases, like a good homeschooling parent, the mother saw this as a special learning opportunity for her child, and encouraged them to ask many questions.  I couldn’t help but smile on both occasions, as it reminded me fondly of the times we would go to such fairs with our younger daughter–whom we also homeschooled–and learn with her about the wonders before us.

We couldn't be at a craft fair without buying something.  One of the things we got was this beautiful three dimensional bee painting by a friend from church.  Notice how the honeycomb extends out from the front of the picture.  We may use it as a decorative display at future fairs/markets.

We couldn’t be at a craft fair without buying something . . . One of the things we got was this beautiful three dimensional bee painting by a friend from church. Notice how the honeycomb extends out from the front of the picture. We may use it as a decorative display at future fairs/markets.

We had come with no expectations as to how much honey we would sell that day, so we were delighted at the amount of business we did.  We had also brought along little business cards, which were generously distributed, and got a few follow up calls from those.

With that experience behind us, we realized that it provided a good venue to not only sell our honey, but also have a lot of fun in the process.  We got to meet a lot of new folks, talk to some long time acquaintances, and encourage a little boy in the process.  It was such a satisfying experience!  And all because I’m married to a wonderful woman who has the ability to see beyond the practical.

I’m praying that the Lord will bless us with a much larger honey harvest this year so we can do more fairs or markets like this one.

Ed

Queens in Hiding?

This past summer, we realized that we had three hives with queens that were probably past their prime.  Two of them were the swarms we caught in the spring, and moved to Nut Hill Farm.  The third was Georgia Tech.  But we discovered the wax moth problem (see Death of a Dear Friend) between the time we ordered the new queen and the time we received her, so we decided to use her in Michigan, which had a queen producing progeny who did not have much desire to build comb.

Our bee mentors were ordering their queens from a supplier in Eastern NC that had a good reputation, and was breeding a number of queens from survivor bee stock.  (These were colonies in a beeyard that had been neglected for a number of years, so the bees had survived varroa, etc., without the intervention of a beekeeper or pest treatments.)  In theory, at least, bees from these “survivor” queens would be more mite resistant.  So we decided to add our order to theirs, and they were kind enough to pick ours up with theirs.

The girls arrived in late August, and we went by our mentors’ home to pick them up early the next morning.  They seemed quite content in their cages with their attendants.  The breeder apparently ran out of the correct color for this year’s queens (green), so all were marked with white (the normal color for years ending with a “1” or a “6.”)  For more information on queen marking, see David Cushman’s Clipping and Marking Queens or “How to mark a queen” at the Honey Bee Suite website.

Royalty in a cage.  Notice the new queen's white marking?

Royalty in a cage. Notice the new queen’s white marking?

We first replaced the queens in the Acorn and Buckeye hives out at Nut Hill Farm.  We really don’t know how old either queen was, since neither was marked.  So we decided that even though we were replacing them, we would give them a chance to each establish a new colony.  We removed three frames from each hive, one with the queen and brood, and the other two with food, and placed each set of three into a nuc.  We finished filling the nucs each with two frames with fresh foundation for the girls to build out.  The nucs were sealed shut and readied for transport back to our home.

Queen installation in Buckeye hive.  Rather than remove a frame, and hang the queen cage between two frames, we placed an Imri shim between the top box and the innner cover, allowing space between the top bars and the inner cover to lay the cage on top of the frames.

Queen installation in Buckeye hive. Rather than remove a frame, and hang the queen cage between two frames, we placed an Imri shim between the top box and the innner cover, allowing space between the top bars and the inner cover to lay the cage on top of the frames.

We placed three new frames with fresh foundation in Acorn and Buckeye, then put on a shim, and layed the queen cages on top of the frames in the top box.  To help the girls with the comb-building and food storage efforts, we placed top feeders on top of the shims.  The girls in each hive clustered around the queen’s cages.  This is always a little scary looking, and causes one to wonder if they’re just curious, or are actually trying to attack the queen and her attendants.  But the whole purpose of introducing the queen in a cage is to allow the girls time to adapt to her pheromones while they chew through the sugar plug in one end of the cage to gain access to her.

Buckeye's girls surrounded the new queen's cage.  This occurred within a matter of seconds after laying the cage on top of the frames.  What motivates such eagerness:  curiosity, a desire to welcome, or animosity?

Buckeye’s girls surrounded the new queen’s cage. This occurred within a matter of seconds after laying the cage on top of the frames. What motivates such eagerness: curiosity, a desire to welcome, or animosity?

This nuc contained the old queen from Buckeye, and was ready to close up and be placed in the van for transport to our backyard apiary, where we can keep a closer eye on it.

This nuc contained the old queen from Buckeye, and was ready to close up and be placed in the van for transport to our backyard apiary, where we can keep a closer eye on it.

We brought the nucs to our home beeyard.  By now, it was late, so we decided to wait until the next morning to place the remaining queen in her new home.  The queen spent the night with us, her attendants meeting her needs as she patiently awaited introduction to her new realm.  We put a couple of drops of water on the cage’s screen mesh so she and her attendants would not get dehydrated.

We didn’t have any other nucs available, so the next day, we used an empty deep, and transferred five frames from Michigan, including a couple of brood frames.  The remaining frames were new ones with fresh foundation.

What has happened in the weeks and months since is where it has gotten interesting . . .

In Michigan and Acorn hives, the queens seemed to emerge normally from their cages, but by mid-September, while both hives had healthy queens who were laying quite nicely, neither was marked.  What happened to our new queens with their pretty white spots?

The story at Buckeye was somewhat different.  By mid-September, we could no longer find a queen, and there were no signs of eggs or young (uncapped) brood.  In addition, there were a number of queen cells from which the queens had already emerged.  What happened?  We kept a close eye on Buckeye, and by early October, we again spotted a queen and significant laying activity.  Our conclusion:  Something happened to the new queen, and the girls made their own.

That still left the question of what happened to the queens in Acorn and Michigan.  Had they been replaced, too?  We didn’t see the absence of a queen, the presence of queen cells, or a break in egg laying, as had happened with Buckeye.  Also, our bee mentors reported that the bees in some of their hives had removed the white paint from their new queens.  I was reluctant to be believe this, but some research on the internet seemed to indicate that this happens with certain types of paints.  So we have finally concluded that those hives both accepted their new queens, but removed their paint.  (Maybe that’s just as well, since the paint color was the wrong one . . .)

A sort of epilogue to this story occurred in mid-January (2015), when we took advantage of a brief warm spell to get into the hives.  All three hives are doing well, although Acorn and Buckeye are doing exceptionally well (more about that in a future post).  However, while Michigan and Acorn (which are in different beeyards) were both docile when we opened them, Buckeye was not.  Guard bees from Buckeye were all over me as soon as I lifted the first frame from the hive, and I had use smoke (which I normally use little or none of with our hives).  This would tend to indicate similar genetics between Michigan and Acorn, but different genetics in Buckeye, where we suspect the introduced queen was replaced.  (This is a bad sign for Buckeye, and may force us to replace its queen again this year.)

There were also interesting results with the older queens which we kept.  I’ll report on those in a future post.

Ed

 

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